These are flashcards an notes made by students on topics like 'parliament', 'room' and 'address', originating from:

- James O'Driscoll
ISBN-10 0194306445 ISBN-13 9780194306447
1736 Flashcards & Notes
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Study Cards on parliament, room, address

What two chambers does the British Parliament consist of?
The House of Commons = Britse lagerhuis = 2e kamer en The House of Lords = Britse Hogerhuis = 1e kamer
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The design of the meeting room of the House of Commons and layout differ from the interior of the parliament buildings in most other countries:(4)
1. The seating arrangement
2. The Commons has no special place for people to stand when they are speaking
3. There are no desks for the MPs
4. The room is very small, there isn't enough room for all the MPs
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Why don't the MPs speak very long?
because there is no desk for notes etc.
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In what way do MPs address each other?
They are not allowed to address each other by name. All remarks and questions must go through the chair. This is an ancient rule formulated to take the heat out of debate and decrease the possibility violence might break out. 
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Where does Parliament reside in London?

In a large builiding called the Palace of Westminster (popularly known as 'the Houses of Parliament') which is right next to westminster Abbey.

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What is distinctive about the British Parliament?
1. The seating arangements: two rows of benches facing each other,  2. no special place to stand when they are speaking.  3. No desks to sit behind.  4. The room is very small, it doesn't fit all 650 MP's, only 400.
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How do MP's address each other?

MP's are forbidden to address one another by name. Al remarks and questions must go 'through the chair'. They speak to each other by saying:  'Mister Speaker, the honourable member for Winchester' or 'my right honourable friend' etc . These rules were originally meant to take the heat out of the debate. Today it lends a touch of formality and gives MP's the feeling they belong to a special group.

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