8 good questions and answers about "The monarchy - The reality"

How does this differ in practice? What "real" power does Queen Elizabeth truly have?
She has to choose someone who will command majority support in the House of Commons. It is really the Prime Minister who decides who the other government ministers are going to be. Somebody else signs the royal assent for her. In reality, the queen has almost no power at all.
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What is the practical reality concerning the power of the monarch in Britain/
In reality the monarch has almost no power at all. She chooses the leader of the strongest party in the house of Commons and this person has more power. He chooses the rest of the ministers. The speech she reads at the state opening of parliament is written for her; decisions are made for her and royal assents are even signed on her behalf.
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What is the reality? What real powers does the Queen have?
She cannot choose anyone she likes to be PM. She has to choose someone who can collect majority in the House of Commons, because according to the law 'her' government can only collect taxes with the agreement of the Commons. If she doesn't choose such a person, the government would stop functioning. In reality, it is the PM who decides who the government ministers are going to be.
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Why does the Queen has to pick someone with a majority of support from the House of Common as the PM?
or else they can't collect taxes (as stated in the law)
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Which of the two Houses of Parliament is the elected chamber?
House of Commons.
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What shows yet again that the Queen has almost no power at all?
  • The speech she reads aloud when she opens Parliament each year, has been written for her. 
  • She cannot refuse a request for dissolution of Parliament.
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Who writes out the royal assent?
Because the royal assent is so automatic, the queen does not even bother to sign it herself, someone else does it in her name.
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The Royal family - family tree
Queen Elizabeth, the Queen mother (mother of Queen Elizabeth II - died in 2002)

Queen Elizabeth II (1926, became Queen in 1952) x Philip Mountbatten (married 1947)
↓                                        ↓                                       ↓                                       ↓
Prince Charles (1948)    Princess Anne (1950)   Prince Andrew (1960)   Prince Edward (1964)
x
Princess Diana (married in 1981, divorced 1992, died 1997)

Prince William (1982) and Prince Harry (1984)
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