Study material generic cover image

Summary Chapter 2 - The endocrine system

Course
- Behavioral Endocrinology
- Katja Teerds
- 2015 - 2016
- Wageningen University (Wageningen University, Wageningen)
- Dierwetenschappen
59 Flashcards & Notes
Scroll down to see the PDF preview!
PLEASE KNOW!!! There are just 59 flashcards and notes available for this material. This summary might not be complete. Please search similar or other summaries.
  • This summary
  • +380.000 other summaries
  • A unique study tool
  • A rehearsal system for this summary
  • Studycoaching with videos
Remember faster, study better. Scientifically proven.
Trustpilot Logo

A snapshot of the summary - Chapter 2 - The endocrine system

  • 2 Chemical communication

  • Explain the different types of chemical mediation
    • Intracrine cells: mediation of intracellular events.
    • Autocrine cells: secrete products that may feed back to affect processes in the cells that originally produced them.
    • Paracrine cells: releases chemical mediators that induce a biological response in an adjacent cell.
    • Endocrine cells: secrete chemicals into the bloodstream, where they may travel to distant target cells.
    • Ectocrine substances (pheromones etc.): released into the environment to communicate with other individuals
  • 4.1 Protein and peptide hormones

  • What are the characteristics of protein and peptide hormones?
    • Soluble in blood
    • Don't need carrier proteins to travel to target cells
    • Removed from the blood through degradation or excretion
  • What does the term "biological half-life" mean?
    The metabolism of a hormone is expressed as the biological half-life of a hormone, which is the amount of time required to remove half of the hormone from the blood.
  • 4.1.1 Hypothalamic hormones

  • What do hormones from the hypothalamus do?
    They are a special class of neurotransmitters that act on a variety of cells in the anterior pituitary.
  • What are the inhibitory hormones that are secreted by the hypothalamus?
    • Growth hormone inhibitory hormone or somatostatin (GHIH)
    • Gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH)
  • What are the releasing hormones that are secreted by the hypothalamus?
    • Tyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)
    • Growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH)
    • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)
    • Melanotropin-releasing hormone (MRH)
    • Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)
    • Kissepeptin
  • What other hormone does the hypothalamus secrete?
    Dopamine (DA) also known as prolactin inhibitory factor (PIH) or melanotropin inhibitory factor (MIF). Technically a monoamine.
  • 4.1.2 Anterior pituitary hormones

  • What 3 types of cells are there in the anterior pituitary?
    1. Acidophils
    2. Basophils
    3. Chromophobes
  • What hormones are secreted by the basophils of the anterior pituitary? What are the characteristics of these hormones?
    1. Luteinizing hormone (LH)
    2. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)
    3. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)


    • They are known as glycoproteins and consist of an alfa and a beta subunit. The alpha subunits of all 3 are the same, and the beta subunits are unique
    • LH and FSH are gonadotropins.
    • TSH is released in response to TRH from the hypothalamus and stimulates the thyroid gland to release thyroid hormones
  • What are the functions of LH and FSH?
    • LH:
      - In males: stimulates Leydig cell development and testosterone production.
      - In females: stimulates corpora lutea development and production of progesterone.
    • FSH:
      - In males: stimulates spermatogenesis
      - In females: stimulates development of ovarian follicles and the secretion of estrogens
PLEASE KNOW!!! There are just 59 flashcards and notes available for this material. This summary might not be complete. Please search similar or other summaries.
Read the full summary
This summary. +380.000 other summaries. A unique study tool. A rehearsal system for this summary. Studycoaching with videos.