10 questions on "Group politics - Types of groups - Associational groups"

What are associational groups?
Groups that are formed by people who come together to pursue shared, but limited goals
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What are associational groups/interest groups?
Organized roups that are formed by people who come together to pursue shared, but limited, goals.
Their primary function is to deal with government and other public bodies.

Influence political systems through pressure politics.

They are characterized by voluntary action and the existence of common interests, aspirations or attitudes.
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When are associational groups called interest groups?
When their primary function is to deal with government and other public bodies.

Influence political systems through pressure politics.
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What are the two classifications of associational groups?
- Sectional and promotional groups
- Insider and outsider groups
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What is the difference between promotional and sectional groups?
Promotional groups advance or protect the interests of their members, while sectional groups advances shared values
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Why do sectional groups exist?
To advance or protect the interest of their members.
F.e. Trade unions, business associations etc.
They represent a section of society (workers, employers etc).
In USA: private interest groups.
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What are promotional groups?
They are set up to advance shared values, ideals or principles.
They aim to help groups other than their members.
In USA: Public interest groups.
F.e. Lobbies on abortion, protests about pollution etc.
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What is the difference between insider and outsider groups?
Whether they have acces to the government or not
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What role do insider groups play within the government?
Insider groups enjoy regular, privileged and usually institutionalized access to government through routine consultation or representation on government bodies.
(often overlap between insider groups and sectional groups).
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What role do outsider groups play within the government?
Outsider groups are either not consulted by government or consulted irregularly. Lacking formal access to government.
These groups are forced to go public in the hope of exercising indirect influence on the policy.

Sometimes these groups choose to remain outsiders, both to preserve their ideological purity and independence, and to protect their decentralized power structures.
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